Douglas Wright

Douglas Wright

I was raised in a mid 50′s era family setting. Three younger sisters, and four-older brothers, me being the youngest of the boys. I grew up resentful to a point of always getting the hand-me-downs, well worn. I was pretty much raised in the woods from the age of nine until I was thirteen and a half as my father was a woodsman and logger. During that time spent in the woods no schools were in my life. except my day-to-day routine in camp helping to keep the large cooking pot going. Whatever was shot during the day went into it and my other duties were to gather wood, water, and help organize.

My education suffered as I later would come to realize. I didn’t attend school until the age of fourteen, but I managed to graduate high school after four years and plenty of extra summer classes. My father being an acute working alcoholic did not believe in school, as did my mother until I was a little older. She also became a victim to alcohol later in her life. I guess it ran in my family as both sets of grandparents drank also. I believe my life being so isolated became ingrained in me to a point, as to all the addictions around me became a prominent way of life. Two failed marriages, loss of family and not much education with a heavy alcohol problem to speak of were factors in me finally reaching the summit of my life. My real education started at the age of twenty-seven. Off to prison I went with alcohol related crimes.

Out of the next twenty-four years, I would spend sixteen years in prison and had found a new way to survive. In all that time, my life felt like it was at a stand still. I would bounce in and out of prison still in my addiction even heavier than before. I started to realize my likfe was in jeopardy as reached my third strike for prison. I made the deal for a long stretch to get the strike off. I began to realize that something was really missing in my life.

In October of 2005, I came to the Good News Rescue Mission with no where else to go. That night I sat in chapel just like everyone else. I don’t remember the minister that evening, but he asked if anyone wanted Jesus in their life. Me being quiet and not wanting any notice, remained silent for a minute, then started thinking, “why not?” God has never been in my life until I really started noticing people around me who gave their life to Christ. Their lives had changed so I raised my arm and from that point my life has not been the same. Sure I backslide and do things I don’t want to do but to go back to my old life, which would make satan very happy. I struggle daily with bi-polar disorder and deptression, but with my Savior walking with me daily as I wake up, my day always starts out with hope, knowing he has died for me and loves me still. These things may not sound like much, but to me, knowing all that He has done for me is all I need to know. This is my new life with Jesus, my Savior.

Douglas Wright